The Lizard Log

The Langkilde Lab in Action

Even Mining Bees Do It

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Animal life of all sorts was springing into action in Central PA this past week. The other day as I was prepping my bike to head into the lab, I noticed a fair bit of activity centered on the pair of dandelions (Taraxacum officinale) just outside my door. Dandelions are one of the first flowers to appear in the Spring and serve as important early sources of food for many pollen-oriented insects.

Upon further inspection, I noticed that a solitary female bee was feeding on one of the dandelion’s pollen and attracting attention from several suitors. Right as I returned with my camera, one of the male bees latched on to the female, and I settled in to observe the proceedings:

In the footage, you can see the male bee attempt multiple matings with the female (and seem to succeed several times). The female seems largely ambivalent to his attentions, preferring to devote herself to the delicious pollen repast in front of her and grooming her shapely antennae. At several points, other, less fortunate suitors make a quick pass at the lucky couple, but do not dislodge the primary male. The bees appear to be members of the genus Andrena, a diverse group of solitary mining bees found throughout the world (Thanks to Dr. Heather Hines for ID help!). These bees are a sign of Spring in many areas. Male bees often become active first and search for emerging females to mate with. Afterwards, they may conduct mate-guarding to prevent other suitors from fertilizing their mate’s eggs and increasing their offspring (and fitness). Happily, we had just talked about this in my Animal Behavior class (Biol 429), so I was able to use the footage you see above as an intro to my next class.

As the weather gets warmer (barring this past weekends’s snow (!) here), I’m looking forward to seeing many more species becoming active and all the neat behaviors they’ll be displaying.

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Author: Chris Thawley

Postdoctoral Fellow at University of Rhode Island; ecologist, herper, discslinger

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