The Lizard Log

The Langkilde Lab in Action

Much Anole About Immunology

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While most of the lab has been down in Alabama, I’ve spent a good part of this summer back at Penn State, working with a species I’ve never used before – the green anole (Anolis carolinensis).

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Isn’t he cute?

There is a test we’d like to use in our fence lizards, called the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test. It involves injecting the pad of a rear foot with a small amount of PHA, which stimulates part of the immune system, and then measuring the swelling that occurs. This swelling is small, and temporary, abating in a few days with no lasting damage. But the level of swelling can provide information about the lizards’ immune function.

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A confused anole having its rear foot measured with calipers.

Unfortunately, while this test has been used in humans, birds, rats, and even amphibians, it has not yet been validated in any reptile species. Ideally I would validate the test in our species of interest, the eastern fence lizard, but I needed a larger number of lizards than we can reasonably catch. So, instead, we decided to purchase some green anoles for this project.

In addition to seeing if the PHA test works in reptiles, we’re also trying to determine if the type of PHA used makes a difference, as there are many different formulations of PHA used, and each formulation may have a different effect. I’m also determining exactly what the immune reaction to the different PHA formulations are, and how this evolves over time after the injection.

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