The Lizard Log

The Langkilde Lab in Action


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Lizard poop and the parasites who love it

A lot of my work in the lab involves assessing the health and well-being of our fence lizards under different conditions, including their parasite burdens. Parasite infestation can vary with immune status, stress, or external factors such as predation (for example, lizards in fire ant invaded areas have fewer ectoparasites). Ectoparasite (ticks, mites, etc.) load is easy to assess, as we count them on each lizard shortly after capture. Internal parasites are a bit trickier, but one method commonly used in veterinary medicine is to collect their feces, and check it for intestinal parasites and eggs.

There are several different methods of testing for intestinal parasites, including direct smears, qualitative fecal flotations, and quantitative fecal egg counts. Direct smears are the simplest method, involving looking at fecal smears directly under a microscope, but they are also the least sensitive, and often don’t show any results. The most sensitive method is qualitative fecal flotations, the method of choice if you want to see all the possible parasites an organism may have in their feces.
The basic idea behind a fecal flotation is a feces sample is mixed with a solution denser than the parasite eggs you are looking for. The mixture is then spun in a swinging-bucket centrifuge. Due to the parasite eggs having a lower density than the solution, they float to the top of the tube while being centrifuged, and collect on a cover slip on the top of the tube. This results in most of the parasite eggs in the fecal sample being concentrated onto the cover slip for easy viewing.
Unfortunately, the fecal flotation method, while a great way to learn how many different types of parasites are in a fecal sample, does not tell you how many individual eggs are in each gram of feces. Such comparisons are important in veterinary medicine in order to tell if a treatment is working, and is important to us in the lab for comparing fecal egg loads between experimental groups. This is where quantitative fecal egg counts become useful. While less sensitive than fecal flotations (they may not identify lower-level infestations of parasites), fecal egg count methods can tell us how many eggs are in each gram of feces. To do this, we precisely dilute a set amount of feces into flotation solution, and mix it thoroughly. The mixture is then placed in a special slide, called a McMaster, and read after 5 minutes, using the grid on the slide.
mcmaster-counting-slides-triple-chamber

The McMaster slide we use

I’ve had some challenges adapting these methods to use in our fence lizards, as both fecal flotation and fecal egg counts require more feces than a lizard normally produces, but I have gotten some interesting results, mostly a variety of strongyle and coccidia eggs.

 

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