The Lizard Log

The Langkilde Lab in Action


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Attracting Unwanted Attention

I’ve certainly attracted my share of unwanted attention: missing a key free throw in a basketball game when everyone in the crowd was watching, faceplanting while exiting stage right in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, or unconsciously ripping a huge burp at a fancy dinner. Fortunately, as a human, the stakes involved in these mistakes were fairly low: a little embarrassment and a good story once the shame had worn off. For many organisms, like lizards, however, attracting unwanted attention in the real world can have serious consequences…

From previous research in the Langkilde Lab, we know that invasive fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) can pose a serious danger to native fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus), and that fence lizards from areas invaded by fire ants respond to encounters with these ants with a variety of twitches and scratches to remove ants as well as fleeing more often to escape them.

We know little, however, about the behavioral rules that govern fleeing and twitching in these lizards. Do they flee more from all predators? Do they flee from all ants? We know the benefit of twitching and fleeing (not getting stung!), but is there any cost to these behaviors? Because we’re ecologists, we looked to answer these questions by conducting a series of experiments and published them in Animal Behaviour.

So, do fence lizards from fire ant-invaded areas flee more from other predators? Because we couldn’t let actual predators attack our lizards, I borrowed a stuffed kestrel (Falco sparverius, a well-known predator of fence lizards), rigged it with a wire harness, attached some very serious and scary-looking eyes, and swung it at unprepared fence lizards to see what their reactions would be.

Taxidermied kestrels are mostly as scary as the real thing.

We found that fence lizards from sites with and without fire ants fled from simulated kestrel attacks the same proportion of the time, and with the same strength and latency (reaction time), suggesting that fence lizards exposed to fire ants don’t flee more from all predators.

We next tested our fence lizards’ reactions to fire ants (which we’ve done before) as well as two types of native ants which might annoy lizards by running on them, but lack the venom (and danger) of fire ants. In fact, these native ants are important sources of food for fence lizards under normal circumstances. In these tests, we found that fence lizards from sites with fire ants fled more from all types of ants, not just fire ants, indicating that this fleeing behavior is generalized to multiple types of ants that they encounter, including those that don’t pose a serious danger.

For the more visually oriented, this series of experiments was illustrated super-well by Tali Hammond, a behavioral ecologist, who was interested in the paper (check out that sweet Sceloporus!)

Check out more illustrated papers by Tali: @mammalLady

So what might the consequences of this generalization be for fence lizards? For one, it’s obviously not ideal to be running away from something (i.e., native ants) that isn’t a threat and should be a meal. This could result in lower food intake or time wasted running away from non-dangerous ants, though we haven’t tested for these effects. More dramatically, twitching and fleeing break crypsis, a lizard’s primary defense against its visually hunting predators, including snakes, and birds of prey like the kestrel. While fence lizards are usually quite well camouflaged, imagine how easy it might be for a predator to spot a lizard jerking around as in the video above. We looked for evidence of this cost in our lizards by quantifying the amount of injuries (broken tails, scars, missing limbs) to lizards at sites with and without fire ants.

A missing “hand” is an example of injuries many fence lizards have.

We found that lizards from sites with fire ants do indeed have more of these injuries than lizards at sites without fire ants. This result suggests that fleeing from fire ants might attract unwanted attention from other types of predators. And when we consider that these lizards also flee more from native ants, which are common in the environment, these antipredator behaviors might have a serious drawback. It is important to note that this evidence is circumstantial; we didn’t see predators preying on lizards running from ants (this would be very difficult), and there could be other explanations for this pattern, such as differences in predator communities, or perhaps differing skill levels of predators. However, this work suggests that lizard that twitch and flee in response to ants may be attacked more.

So why do we see this behavior if it has these drawbacks? My personal guess is that it comes down to consequences. As a human, the consequences of my unwanted attention were fairly minor (shame). The stakes for fence lizards are a bit higher: fleeing can lead to running from your own dinner or attracting attention from predators. BUT the costs of not fleeing when attacked by fire ants are likely even higher (serious injury or death). And in many areas fire ants are much more common and likely to interact with lizards more frequently than snakes and kestrels. In other words, the lizards are likely making the best choice available to them. In the future, perhaps, they will adapt to distinguish between dangerous and native ants, allowing them to make more optimal decisions, and reduce the costs of these antipredator behaviors. More broadly speaking, I believe this research shows that we need to consider a wide variety of potential costs as well as benefits when looking at organisms adapting to changes in their environments.

The full paper in Animal Behaviour can be found here.


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Conference time for the Langkilde lab!

The Langkilde lab has recently returned from its annual pilgrimage to the SICB (Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology) meeting, which this year was held in beautiful New Orleans! All our lab members presented talks, and had a great time networking, catching up on top research, and telling people about our own.

Below are some of our thoughts on the meeting, summaries of what we presented – and some tips for conference-goers from all fields!

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Langkilde lab members past and present reunited at SICB (photo: Cate Pritchard)

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Beautiful New Orleans (photo: Kirsty MacLeod)

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Cam and Tracy hang out at the Data Blitz (photo: Cate Pritchard)

Kirsty MacLeod
“I talked about a paper I’ve been working on from our field season in Alabama last summer. Animals encounter environmental stressors daily; how does frequent, low-level stress influence survival and reproductive success? We show that, in Eastern fence lizards, a daily dose of low-concentration stress hormone led to increased adult mortality, and decreased hatching success of her eggs. This was the first conference I’ve been to where animal behaviour hasn’t been the primary focus – this reflects my broadening interests – I’m really excited by integrative research, so this meeting was a great way to see what other people are doing in more mechanistic fields (physiology, genetics, etc). It gave me lots of ideas for taking my own work forward!

My top conference tips are to contact people in advance that you want to talk to – that way you’ll be less likely to chicken out of approaching them! And – make use of Twitter before, during, and after the conference. It’s a great, informal networking tool. I met up with loads of top researchers that I’d first contacted on Twitter, and made lots of new friends!”

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Chris Howey

“I talked about the effect of temperature on the mode of locomotion a snake uses.  As a reptiles body temperature changes, so does its ability to perform specific tasks (digest a meal, sprint away from a predator, etc).  I was interested in how body temperature affected a snake’s ability to move, or slither, across its landscape.  I found that body temperature does affects how well they move, but also affects how they move.  As a snake warms up, it changes its mode of locomotion, uses different muscles, and performs differently.  One could compare this to a horse trotting at lower body temperatures and galloping at warmer body temperatures.  Obviously these are two different types of performances, and the question we raised with my talk is “Can we compare different performances across a single thermal performance curve?”  We argue that it depends on the question being asked.  Are you interested in the muscles, or the mechanisms behind the performance and how temperature affects those mechanisms?  Or, are you interested in the ecological ramifications of slithering across the landscape (i.e., escape a predator)?  Comparing different modes of locomotion along the same thermal performance curve may be flawed if your question is more the former, but may be justified if your question is more the later.
What I enjoyed most about SICB was talking with fellow colleagues and introducing myself to many new people.  SICB is a huge conference, but with a little effort, you can easily cross paths with someone conducting research you are interested in, someone whose research you’ve admired, someone you’ve only talked with on social media, and now you can see that person face-to-face, introduce yourself, and make a new connection.  And who knows, you may even grab a beer with a few of them.
This actually leads into my #1 tip for people going to conferences: Make an effort to introduce yourself to somebody new.  Once you do this, you will realize that it is nothing to be scared of, and you will find yourself talking with more and more new friends and colleagues.” 

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David Ensminger
“I presented on the impact of a stress treatment on maternal behavior and offspring physiology and morphology. The thing I enjoyed the most was getting to meet not only senior researchers but also new researchers and hearing both of their perspectives. 

My tip is to go to the socials and groups at night. They are fantastic places to talk with and meet people.

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Cam Venable
“We already know fire ants are an invasive predator to many organisms, including fence lizards. What I want to focus on is the interaction of Fence Lizards and Fire ants, but as a prey source. This is the first step in my research, by using this study system, to understand how native species adapt to invasive species. The academic side of me really enjoyed meeting other scientist and just chitchatting in informal ways. The 24 year old side of me loved the location of SICB, considering it was in New Orleans!

 Tips for conferences: Well this was my very first conference and I was worried about how to interact with so many bright and accomplished minds. The best and most cliché bit of advice I have, is simply be you. There is no point in putting on a different face, if you’re not even comfortable in it.”

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Michaleia Mead

“The water chemistry of vernal pools are often impacted by the environment. Changes in the pH and UVB impact the larval amphibians that live there. But how? Stay tuned for an upcoming publication! I LOVED meeting new people. I especially enjoyed meeting people who are working outside of my field of study. Their perspectives on my work are often very different than those within my field and I learn a lot from them.

My advice: TALK TO EVERYONE! You never know who you will meet. If you see a poster you don’t usually have an interest in, just stop and ask a question. If nothing else you may make a friend!

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Braulio Assis

“Going to SICB for the first time was fantastic, and New Orleans is a peculiar, very musical city, which I appreciated a lot. Being exposed to research from large variety of fields in biology certainly allowed me to appreciate other research areas better, so I definitely recommend attending talks that are out of your comfort zone. You never know what new ideas you might come up with!

Another valuable tip I have is, to never underestimate the power of a 25-minute nap during lunch break. The amount of information you receive over multiple days in a conference can be a bit overwhelming, so it’s important to rest whenever possible. It also helps you enjoy the nightlife better!”

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Dustin Owen

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Caty Tylan

“I presented info on validating the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test in the green anole as a test of cell-mediated immune function. I also discussed how there are different types of PHA, and how the immune response to PHA differed in the anoles between two of these types (PHA-P and PHA-L). I most enjoyed going to talks, and meeting with researchers whose work I’ve been interested in. Also, the food was great.
My number one tip is to contact people to talk to ahead of time, because I certainly wouldn’t have been able to make myself do it during the conference. And take advantage of the lunch and  networking opportunities SICB sent out before the conference.”

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Tracy Langkilde
Many of you would have played with Mexican Jumping Beans as a child. Ever wondered why it is that they jump? I presented some undergraduate-led research revealing what motivates this fascinating behavior.

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One JMIH in the books

Destination: New Orleans, Louisiana

Purpose: 100th Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists

Dates: July 6th- July 10th

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Early morning flight out of State College and I couldn’t resist a cloud picture.

Flying has never been my favorite thing but I was really excited for this trip. To say I was also nervous would be the understatement of the century. I had been told about all of the important and, in my mind, “big name” people I would meet. These same people would potentially be at my talk. No pressure though, right? Wrong! I booked a practice room the morning of my talk (the 7th) and had a half an hour to work out all of the bug in my talk. I was certain I would never be ready but I had no choice. After weeks of preparation for my first talk, it was finally time to get up in front of a room full of strangers, important strangers. The whole thing was a blur but everyone clapped and a few of the observers even came up to talk to me after. It was a huge relief for me to be done with my talk because that meant I could go to other talks and meetings and enjoy myself. I met some of those “big name people” and believe it or not, they were people just like you and I. Who would have thought?!

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Seeing your name in print for everyone else to see is a pretty great feeling.

Throughout the conference I got to see quite a bit of the city of New Orleans. I saw live music, street performers, and the place where the Mardi Gras floats are made. I had some amazing food, some a little too spicy for my tastes but, when in Rome.. I made friends from all over the country and learned a lot about what I wanted to do with the rest of my life. I had no idea there were so many options in this field. There was a live concert put on by those members of the conference who brought instruments, an unlimited Rock ‘N’ Bowl, and so much free food. I cannot put into words how rewarding and fun this trip was for me.

To wrap up the conference, there was a live auction with a lot of interesting things to bid on. The first thing I could work up the courage to bid on was a “The Book of Frogs”. Lucky for me it was a student only item so only other poor graduate students could bid against me. The auctioneers were so entertaining that I didn’t mind that I wasn’t bidding. The night ended a little later then anticipated but I think it was worth it.

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I was irrationally excited about this win!

The whole trip made me grateful to be studying wood frogs and to be a part of this scientific community. I would recommend that every new graduate student attend a meeting/conference of some sort as early as they can. The networking possibilities are endless, communicating your work to others is priceless, plus it is a blast! If giving a talk seems like too much, poster presentations are another great option. You truly never know who you are going to meet! Stay tuned for more updates from the Lizard Lab!


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Word Clouds and Receptions

The end is near! I am happy to report that both Chris and I have submitted our final dissertations to the graduate school. What a relief!  Now that my dissertation is off to the printers, I decided to do some stats…

Unsurprisingly, the most used word in my dissertation (excluding common words), is “stress,” clocking in at a word count of 392 (out of 35K total words). Close behind were CORT (296), lizards (225), immune (201), and ants (144). Sounds about right! (The most used word was “of,” with a word count of 681. Fascinating!)

I couldn’t help but display this graphically, because who doesn’t love a word cloud?

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A word cloud featuring the most commonly used words in my dissertation. Note that “killing” applies to bacteria only! (Make your own at wordle.net)

For those of you keeping track, this is the “cleaned up” version–the original was quite overwhelming! I removed the citations and statistics as well as a number of prepositions,  less exciting words (“may” was a big one), and anything that occurred fewer than 20 times throughout my dissertation.

In other news, Tracy and I recently attended the 2016 Penn State Alumni Association Recognition Dinner, where I was presented with the Alumni Association Dissertation Award.

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Receiving the award. Thanks Penn State Alumni Association!

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Dave Eissenstat, head of the Ecology program, and Tracy helped celebrate at the recognition dinner.

The 13 graduate student winners were invited to talk about their research. I chose to highlight the last two chapters of my dissertation, which have been submitted to various journals. Here’s a sneak peak of the findings, as described in my short talk/acceptance speech:

My dissertation research addresses the circumstances under which stress produces negative consequences. Animals, including humans, have a way of dealing with stress, called the physiological stress response. This response involves a suite of changes in the body to help an animal deal with and recover from the stressor—these changes can mobilize energy and induce certain helpful behaviors to help deal with the stressor. Because of this stress response, experiencing a stressor isn’t always a “bad thing”.

That said, in order for these changes to occur, an animal temporarily pulls energy away from other systems that aren’t immediately important—like growth and reproduction. That means when stress is frequent, when it doesn’t go away, there can be negative consequences on these traits—on growth, reproduction, and immune function.

The immediate consequences of stress are fairly well studied, but we know less about how stress experienced during development or in previous generations can affect adult traits.

To investigate this, I took advantage of populations of eastern fence lizards that co-evolved with different levels of stress in the environment. Some populations co-occur with invasive fire ants, which bite and sting lizards. These encounters are stressful for the lizards, and if you’ve been stung by a fire ant, I’m sure you can relate. So this study system gives us a unique opportunity to look at populations that have long history—many generations—of high–stress and compare to populations that do not have history with this kind of stress.

My research reveals that ancestral history with stress is actually really important. If a lizard’s ancestors experienced high-stress, that affects how it responds to stress as an adult—regardless of its personal experience with stress within its lifetime. So it’s not what it went through, but what its ancestors went through, that determines how robustly it responds to stress.

But it turns out the combination of a lizard’s personal experience and its ancestors’ experience that determines the immune consequences of stress. Researchers don’t usually consider how stress in previous generations can affect physiology, but my research indicates this should not be overlooked

Understanding when stress will become beneficial and when it becomes harmful will allows us to better predict how animals will be affected by the increasing amounts of stress due to global change, and to better allocate resources to manage these effects.

I would like to thank the Penn State Ecology Program and my advisor, Tracy Langkilde, without whom I could not have completed my degree. I would also like to thank my boyfriend, Rich, for his support and the Alumni Association for the recognition. It is a privilege to have your support, and I am excited to join the thriving community of Penn State alumni. Thank you.

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Major thanks to my boyfriend, Rich, who supported me not only at the dinner, but throughout my graduate studies. You’re the best!

 


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But Do They Make Omelets?

Short answer: Nope. Fire ants like their lizard eggs raw. Our recently accepted paper in the Journal of Herpetology “Invasive Fire Ant (Solenopsis invicta) Predation of Eastern Fence Lizard (Sceloporus undulatus) eggs” shows that fire ants do indeed eat fence lizard eggs in a natural setting, but, despite being known as “fire” ants, these hymenopterans haven’t quite mastered the art of cooking their food prior to chowing down. Get your non-final, still with a couple of mistakes, pre-print copy online (paywalled) or download one from this blog (posted for personal use of our readers courtesy of SSAR)!

At this point, you may be asking yourself, “Why should I care if fire ants eat fence lizard eggs?”, so I’ll discuss the impetus behind this project. Previous research in the lab had given us a good idea of how fire ants can impact juvenile and adult fence lizards: they are found frequently on the ground by fire ants, stung if they don’t run away, and can be envenomated when eating fire ants. BUT we knew incredibly little about what impacts fire ants might have on one unexplored life stage of fence lizards: eggs! And unlike juveniles and adults, these eggs can’t flee or twitch when attacked by fire ants; they remain in a nest for 55-70 days (depending on site and temperature), during which time they might be vulnerable to fire ants. Additionally, fence lizards often (though not always) prefer sandy sites with low canopy cover, where sunlight can warm the nest, exactly the type of microhabitat beloved by fire ants. And fence lizards build their nests 4-8 cm underground, right at the same depths where fire ants construct their underground foraging tunnels. We surmised that fire ants might come into contact with fence lizard eggs with some frequency, and, if fire ants ate the eggs, this might have a large impact on fence lizard populations.

Fire ants are known to eat the eggs of other reptiles, including those of snakes, turtles, and some lizards (such as anoles). To determine if fire ants were physically capable of eating fence lizard eggs, Jill Newman (a former lab undergrad who just started her master’s at Clemson…wooooooo!), Tracy, and I designed a small experiment. We presented fence lizard eggs to captive fire ant colonies and observed them penetrate the eggs in less than 30 minutes…a rather dramatic response! However, we also wanted to see whether fire ants might eat fence lizard eggs under more natural conditions. To address this, Jill dug holes in the ground to the depth of fence lizard nests and placed 12 eggs near fire ant mounds overnight. Upon examination, 11 of the 12 eggs had been punctured and eaten in less than a day!

The next summer, I designed a follow-up experiment to learn more about this type of predation. Specifically, I wanted to know how many eggs fire ants might eat, how quickly they might find them, and whether any environmental variables, like distance of a fence lizard nest from a fire ant mound, might affect predation. To address this, I started by collecting fence lizard eggs. A LOT of fence lizard eggs (over 150!…I resisted the urge to make my own omelet).

I couldn’t, however, just bury the eggs in the ground and check them after 24 hours (as Jill did) to answer my question about how long eggs might survive…I had to be (a little) creative. After reading about a similar problem faced by Kurt Buhlmann and his solution when he wanted to monitor turtle eggs, I developed a method allowing me to monitor the eggs daily without disturbing them (which might attract fire ants and increase predation).

For each nest, I dug a hole into the ground and sunk into it a clear, capped acrylic tube. I carefully replaced the sandy soil around each tube and placed six eggs (a small, but reasonable size for a fence lizard nest) next to the tube. I inserted a small piece of plastic transparency above the eggs and then carefully covered the whole arrangement with the soil. The transparency prevented soil from entering between the eggs and the acrylic tube, and, by lowering a video camera into the tube, I could count the eggs and see if they were being attacked by ants (or other predators). At each “nest” I also measured the amount of canopy cover and the distance to the nearest fire ant mound.

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Diagram of nest tube with camera for viewing eggs underground.

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…aaaaand what one of them looks like in the ground.

Each day, for up to 20 days, I monitored the nests and recorded if all the eggs were present. If I found ants attacking the eggs, I waited a few hours to let them eat the eggs (or at least let them make a start) and then dug up the nest to catch and identify some of the ants. I can definitively say that fire ants do not like to be disturbed when they are in the middle of a meal! Because of our innovative setup, it only took about 3 minutes a day to monitor each nest (check out a couple of examples below).

In our trials, we found that 24% of nests were attacked by fire ants within 20 days. Extrapolating this to the full incubation period of fence lizards using a mathematical model, we estimated that up to 61% of fence lizard nests are in danger of being preyed on by fire ants. We also did not find any relationship between how far nests were from fire ant mounds and how likely they were to be eaten. Given the high densities of fire ants at many areas in the Southeast, it seems likely that fire ants prey on a substantial portion of fence lizard nests in the wild. Of course, we know that fence lizard populations where we do our research are not in danger of disappearing. Fence lizards are doing fine even in the face of this predation, which is great news, and suggests that survival in other parts of a fence lizard’s life or high reproductive output may allow them to persist in fire ant invaded areas. In the future, I am aiming to build mathematical population models to understand the impacts of egg predation by fire ants, and see how this predation may affect populations over the long term.

One other point of note is that, for many species of southeastern herps that are declining, such as kingsnakes or southern hognose snakes, fire ants are often suggested as a culprit without any definitive proof. My project suggests that fire ants can indeed prey on large portions of the nests of some species, but also shows that one species is doing just fine even when fire ants may be making a buffet of about half of its nests. Moving forward, I would recommend that lab and field trials like those we’ve done be used to pinpoint if fire ants are indeed a threat to the eggs of these other species, and, if so, what proportion of nests are at risk.


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Portland: Talks and Trolls

The fifth airport of the day was thankfully the last. I opted to save $200 in airfare by selecting a rather awful itinerary, but I’m not sure I would do that again. In spite of traveling during the post-holiday rush, by some stroke of luck I arrived in Portland on time (midnight local time, which felt like 3am!), eager to sleep and then take on SICB!

The 2016 annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) began with a plenary talk by Dr. Terrie Williams from UC Santa Cruz. Dr. Williams discussed a number of her research projects involving the energetics of big carnivores. This of course meant many awesome photos of her study organisms, which include polar bears, pumas, killer whales, and lions. For me, the most memorable part of her talk was about her research on narwhals. Yes that’s right, narwhals.

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Narwhals doing their thing.

Williams described narwhals as “endurance animals.” They cannot swim very quickly and attempt to escape predator attacks by submerging under arctic ice and hoping to “outlast” the predator’s need for air. The normal resting heart rate of a narwhal is about 60 beats per minute (bpm), similar to humans, but this slows to about 20 bpm when they dive. However, narwhals are very sensitive to disturbance, including shipping noise, and, when disturbed, their heart rate slows to as few as 3 to 4 bpm! It takes over an hour to return to the dive rate of 20 bpm. The consequences of this drastic physiological change are unclear, and Williams wonders how these animals will be able to cope as the Arctic is further disturbed by seismic surveys and exploration for oil and other resources. Much of Williams’s other research was just as interesting (polar bears on treadmills!), and her talk was a fabulous opening the conference.

In addition to really cool talks like this, SICB is a great meeting for grad students to attend for several reasons. They have strong financial support to allow cash-strapped students to attend. For instance, SICB offers the Charlotte Magnum program, which gives discounted housing in exchange for volunteering to help out at the conference for up to a half a day (though you should find a friend since you’ll be sharing a bed or sleeping on a floor!). The volunteering involves helping at the registration desk or running A/V for a particular session. This can be a great chance to meet a cool group of scientists who are presenting in a session of special interest, and mostly just involves watching talks you want to see anyways!

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SICB student accommodations often include unheard of amenities, such as the incredibly rare toiletphone, so you can conduct business while….conducting your business.

SICB also offers special support for women grad students and post-docs as well as competitive grants for graduate student travel and research. The divisional structure of SICB also offers lots of chances to meet big-name scientists at smaller events, like socials, and provides great opportunities for networking or figuring out possibilities for your next position, either in a grad program or as a post-doc.

Lastly, SICB is one of the better-organized conferences out there (maybe due to all the brilliant grad students helping to run it!). Testing and posting your presentation is very easy (our lab’s videos of lizard behaviors always work at SICB…unlike at some other meetings…). This year, for instance, with registration, SICB included weekly passes for unlimited rides on the Portland public transit system, including the convenient MAX light rail, which made getting around Portland really easy.

Chris T and I were up for student awards in our respective divisions (the Division of Ecology and Evolution (DEE) and Division of Comparative Endocrinology (DCE)), and our talks were back-to-back on the first day of the conference. Our talks were well received, and we were in good company–the other talks in our sessions were great!

Also quite memorable was the Division of Comparative Endocrinology’s Data Blitz, which took place during the DCE social. In this event, speakers have 2 minutes to describe research results, and they usually do so in unconventional ways. Poetry, photoshop, and Star Wars references abounded. One speaker also told a story of a research assistant meeting–and leaving field work for–a unique and sensual man. Suddenly my field stories don’t seem so exciting!

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DCE’s flyer for the Data Blitz. I’ll be sure to attend next time I’m at SICB!

I also took the opportunity to explore the area. My first stop was to the unfathomably large Powell’s Bookstore, which boasts an inventory of over two million books. Two million!! I spent time in two of their eight rooms but easily could have spent hours perusing their stock. They also had a great quantity of board games and other novelty items. I should have brought a larger suitcase!

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Don’t be fooled, Powell’s takes up the entire block!

Just down the street from Powell’s, I stopped in at Billy Galaxy, which has an impressive display of (overpriced) vintage toys and collectibles from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. I drooled over some Star Wars and Jurassic Park toys and continued onward with my bank accounts intact.

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Billy Galaxy’s small but impressive store, with plenty of collectibles from Star Wars, Smurfs, Transformers, Jurassic Park, Nintendo, Godzilla, and more!

I also stopped at Voodoo Doughnut, a Portland staple. They had all kinds of novelty doughnuts, stuffed with colored cream and topped with cereals. I took on peanut butter oreo doughnut, which was delicious but horribly sweet. Definitely something to be shared. Next time I’ll bring a friend!

The unique and protruding neon sign at Voodoo Doughnut and the squished peanut butter oreo doughnut that I conquered.

The unique and protruding neon sign at Voodoo Doughnut and the squished peanut butter oreo doughnut that I conquered.

I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to investigate at least one antique store while in the area. I rather enjoy visiting antique shops and even have an instagram account dedicated to some of my more “unique” finds (h/t to Chris for the name!). I visited Antique Alley, which was only one light rail stop away from my hotel. As a troll collector, I was pleased to find more than a few to add to my collection, including the santa trolls pictured below. I can only imagine TSA’s reaction to scanning a bag lined with trolls…

Some recent acquisitions. I heart my trolls! | Antique Alley, Portland OR

A post shared by Antiques Freakshow (@antiquesfreakshow) on

All in all it was a successful trip, full of good science talks, satisfying food places, and even a few trolls.

 

Thanks to Chris T for adding in why SICB is such a great conference!


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Gearing up for SICB!

Happy New Year!

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New year, new beginnings. And hats. Lots of hats.

As we start to wrap up our holiday break, Chris T. and I are preparing for a trip to Portland, Oregon for the 2016 annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB). We will both be presenting talks on Monday.

I will be expanding on results I presented at ESA in August, which address how stress (fire ants) experienced in early life or in previous generations affect adult physiology and immune function in lizards. My talk is Monday, January 4th at 11:15 in room B110/111.

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Chris will be sharing his results from SSAR with a new audience. He will discuss how invasive fire ants have reversed geographical patterns in fence lizard ecology, including their behavior, stress responses, and morphology, across their range in less than 75 years. Chris’s talk is also on Monday, January 4th at 11:30 in room B114. A determined Langkilde Lab follower could attend both talks back to back in nearby rooms! 🙂

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Come say hello if you will be there!