The Lizard Log

The Langkilde Lab in Action


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Undergraduate research in the spotlight!

The Langkilde lab was well-represented at this year’s Undergraduate Research Symposium by three of our lab researchers! It’s been an excellent year for undergraduate research. Congratulations to Richard Novak, Kristen Sprayberry, and Andrea Racic on their poster presentations! Not pictured is Jennifer Heppner, who also completed a brilliant thesis in the Langkilde lab this year. It’s been a pleasure having you all in the lab, and we will be sorry to see you go – but look forward to hearing about your future endeavours!

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A New Blood Sampling Method for Smaller Anurans that Preserves Critical Features of Specimens

Another new paper from Dustin In Herpetological Review! Summary below.

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Obtaining adequate blood samples is vital for most studies involving immunology or physiology. Anurans (frogs and toads) present a particular challenge for obtaining adequate samples, largely because of their relatively small size compared to other vertebrates.

Here, we propose a new method for obtaining large amounts of blood from the ventral abdominal vein of euthanized frogs, which we call the lethal abdominal vein of anurans (LAVA) technique.

We tested this method on the locally common Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus –  pictured above). Using the LAVA technique, we were able to collect blood from 100% of frogs. Each frog yielded an average of 0.09 mL (range: 0.03 to 0.17 mL) of blood, which contained an average of 40 µL (range: 15 to 100 µL) of plasma.

We also found that neither size, ambient temperature, nor site affected our blood yields. We show that the LAVA technique is an easy-to-use method that yields high amounts of blood from anurans, and could be potentially viable in other small vertebrates.


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Offspring influenced by their evolutionary history more than their own experience in fence lizards

Check out the first chapter of Dustin’s thesis on the “Trans-generational but not early life exposure to stressors influences offspring morphology and survival”, recently published in Oecologia!
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Environmental changes, such as the introduction of non-native species, can impose novel selective pressures. This can result in changes in fitness-relevant traits within an individual’s lifetime or across multiple generations. We investigated the effects of early life versus trans-generational exposure to a predatory invasive insect stressor, the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta), on the morphology and survival of the eastern fence lizard (Sceloporus undulatus). We captured gravid lizards from high-stress populations with long histories of invasion by fire ants and from uninvaded sites. Resulting hatchlings were exposed weekly to one of the three treatments until they reached maturity (42 weeks): (1) sub-lethal attack by fire ants; (2) topical application of the stress-relevant hormone, corticosterone (CORT), to mimic the stress of fire ant attack; or (3) control handling. Exposure to post-natal early life stress (fire ants or CORT) did not interact with a population’s evolutionary history of stress to affect morphology or survival and early life stress did not affect these fitness-relevant traits. However, morphology and survival were associated with the lizards’ evolutionary history of exposure to fire ants. Offspring of lizards from fire ant invaded sites had longer and faster growing hind-limbs, gained body length and lost condition more slowly in the first 16 weeks, and had lower in-lab survival to 42 weeks, compared to lizards from uninvaded sites. These results suggest that a population’s history of stress/invasion caused by fire ants during ca. 38 generations may be more important in driving survival-relevant traits than are the early life experiences of an organism.

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You can read more about Dustin’s research here and here! 


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Testing the environmental matching hypothesis – return to Alabama!

Another summer field season has now come and gone! This summer I returned to Solon Dixon Forestry Education Center in Alabama (one of my favourite spots on earth!) to continue my research on how stress during gestation influences the offspring of eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus).

Last year, we investigated how physiological stress during gestation (at the level of a non-lethal predator encounter – for example, when a lizard encounters a couple of toxic fire ants, but isn’t killed by the ants) affects survival of mothers, and how many of their eggs successfully hatch. You can read more about this experiment, and the fieldwork that went into it, here (and stay posted for the published results soon!).

This year I wanted to build on these results and ideas to test how maternal stress influences the offspring that do hatch and make it out into the world. Do they themselves then cope better with a stressful environment, having been “primed” for it by their mothers (the “environmental matching” hypothesis)? Or are offspring born to stressed mothers poorer in quality, and less likely to survive in the wild, regardless of how stressful their environment is? In order to test these ideas, we first made the long trip south to collect gravid females from south Alabama early in the summer, and to build experimental enclosures in which to eventually release their offspring. I then repeated the maternal stress treatment from last year and once again became a lizard mama as I followed the females from laying their eggs, to incubating the eggs, and eventually seeing these bite-sized babies hatch out!

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Freshly hatched fence lizards – <1g!

Once they hatched, the offspring went into the enclosures that we’d built. These enclosures were designed to test whether maternal stress programs offspring to be able to better deal with a stressful environment. The enclosures either contained a key stressor (invasive fire ants), or were fire ant-free. Each day I conducted a mini-census, walking through enclosures to look for each lizard – as you can see in the video below, babies were marked so I could tell exactly who was present each day (and so, which lizards survived, and which didn’t). I also observed their behaviour, and how they used the habitat available to them (for example, did offspring from stressed/non-stressed mothers differ in whether they liked to be out in the open, like the lizards you see in the video – or did they hide more?).

After a great summer (if measuring 200+ baby lizards isn’t a metric of a great summer, I don’t know what is), I’m now back at Penn State with a box of data to work through. I’m excited to report back on what I found in the coming months – so stay tuned!

 

 

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Hanging out with an adult female Sceloporus at Solon Dixon

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Beautiful Solon Dixon


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It’s fieldwork season!

The lab is currently busy with a variety of field and lab-based projects. In April/May, Cam, David, Tom, and I were in Alabama collecting lizards. Here’s a glimpse of what the long trip to the South, and our work there, looks like! Check back later in the summer for more on the continuation of this project.


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Switching fields

Hello, my name is Heather Engler. I have been working as a research assistant in the Langkilde lab since May 2016. And yet my background is not in biology. Instead, I have a B.S. degree in Accounting from Murray State University. So how did I wind up going from business to biology?

I began dating Dustin Owen, my boyfriend, while he was at Austin Peay State University. I was fascinated with his reptile research because I have always enjoyed learning about animals. So I naturally took an interest in his new eastern fence lizard research here at Penn State. I was really lucky that Tracy Langkilde didn’t mind me spending time with Dustin in her lab. I got to learn about all sorts of things from various lab members.

Last summer, Dustin and some of his new lab mates caught lots of eastern fence lizards to be used in their research projects. They were busy with their research, so they needed someone else to take care of the lizards on a daily basis. Since I had not landed an accounting job, Dustin put in a good word for me with Tracy. Luckily, she was willing to give me a chance.

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Female fence lizard digging a nest (photo: Heather Engler)

I absolutely loved taking care of those lizards last summer! Some of the females became gravid, and I got to help collect the eggs after they finished laying them. After all of the females had laid their eggs, it was time to incubate them in the lab. One random day in July, I was checking on the eggs and noticed some tiny bodies. The first of the eggs had hatched! It was so cool because the hatchlings were so little compared to the adults. Since we were short staffed at the time, I got to help record the morphology data on the hatchlings. I even learned how to toe clip them. I had never done this kind of work before, so it was a fun learning experience.

Since I had done such a good job with the adults, Tracy let me also take care of the hatchlings. And it has been a blast watching over those lizards. It won’t be too much longer until they’re fully matured adults. I’m even getting to help on a side project concerning them. Braulio Assis, one of the current grad students in the lab, has been taking photos of the juvenile lizards at 9 week intervals. One of the things he wants to know is if testosterone levels are related to the size of male cloaca scales. I’m helping to answer this question by measuring the area of the male cloaca scales in the photographs of the male juveniles. I get to use this really cool software, called ImageJ, to trace around the scales in order to get the measurements.

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Hatchling fence lizards (photo: Heather Engler)

If you had told me 5 years ago that I would go from working in the accounting department of an engineering firm to working in the lab of a world famous biologist, I wouldn’t have believed you. But here I am. I have moved from business to biology, and I couldn’t be happier.

 

 

[posted on behalf of Heather Engler]


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Conference time for the Langkilde lab!

The Langkilde lab has recently returned from its annual pilgrimage to the SICB (Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology) meeting, which this year was held in beautiful New Orleans! All our lab members presented talks, and had a great time networking, catching up on top research, and telling people about our own.

Below are some of our thoughts on the meeting, summaries of what we presented – and some tips for conference-goers from all fields!

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Langkilde lab members past and present reunited at SICB (photo: Cate Pritchard)

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Beautiful New Orleans (photo: Kirsty MacLeod)

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Cam and Tracy hang out at the Data Blitz (photo: Cate Pritchard)

Kirsty MacLeod
“I talked about a paper I’ve been working on from our field season in Alabama last summer. Animals encounter environmental stressors daily; how does frequent, low-level stress influence survival and reproductive success? We show that, in Eastern fence lizards, a daily dose of low-concentration stress hormone led to increased adult mortality, and decreased hatching success of her eggs. This was the first conference I’ve been to where animal behaviour hasn’t been the primary focus – this reflects my broadening interests – I’m really excited by integrative research, so this meeting was a great way to see what other people are doing in more mechanistic fields (physiology, genetics, etc). It gave me lots of ideas for taking my own work forward!

My top conference tips are to contact people in advance that you want to talk to – that way you’ll be less likely to chicken out of approaching them! And – make use of Twitter before, during, and after the conference. It’s a great, informal networking tool. I met up with loads of top researchers that I’d first contacted on Twitter, and made lots of new friends!”

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Chris Howey

“I talked about the effect of temperature on the mode of locomotion a snake uses.  As a reptiles body temperature changes, so does its ability to perform specific tasks (digest a meal, sprint away from a predator, etc).  I was interested in how body temperature affected a snake’s ability to move, or slither, across its landscape.  I found that body temperature does affects how well they move, but also affects how they move.  As a snake warms up, it changes its mode of locomotion, uses different muscles, and performs differently.  One could compare this to a horse trotting at lower body temperatures and galloping at warmer body temperatures.  Obviously these are two different types of performances, and the question we raised with my talk is “Can we compare different performances across a single thermal performance curve?”  We argue that it depends on the question being asked.  Are you interested in the muscles, or the mechanisms behind the performance and how temperature affects those mechanisms?  Or, are you interested in the ecological ramifications of slithering across the landscape (i.e., escape a predator)?  Comparing different modes of locomotion along the same thermal performance curve may be flawed if your question is more the former, but may be justified if your question is more the later.
What I enjoyed most about SICB was talking with fellow colleagues and introducing myself to many new people.  SICB is a huge conference, but with a little effort, you can easily cross paths with someone conducting research you are interested in, someone whose research you’ve admired, someone you’ve only talked with on social media, and now you can see that person face-to-face, introduce yourself, and make a new connection.  And who knows, you may even grab a beer with a few of them.
This actually leads into my #1 tip for people going to conferences: Make an effort to introduce yourself to somebody new.  Once you do this, you will realize that it is nothing to be scared of, and you will find yourself talking with more and more new friends and colleagues.” 

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David Ensminger
“I presented on the impact of a stress treatment on maternal behavior and offspring physiology and morphology. The thing I enjoyed the most was getting to meet not only senior researchers but also new researchers and hearing both of their perspectives. 

My tip is to go to the socials and groups at night. They are fantastic places to talk with and meet people.

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Cam Venable
“We already know fire ants are an invasive predator to many organisms, including fence lizards. What I want to focus on is the interaction of Fence Lizards and Fire ants, but as a prey source. This is the first step in my research, by using this study system, to understand how native species adapt to invasive species. The academic side of me really enjoyed meeting other scientist and just chitchatting in informal ways. The 24 year old side of me loved the location of SICB, considering it was in New Orleans!

 Tips for conferences: Well this was my very first conference and I was worried about how to interact with so many bright and accomplished minds. The best and most cliché bit of advice I have, is simply be you. There is no point in putting on a different face, if you’re not even comfortable in it.”

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Michaleia Mead

“The water chemistry of vernal pools are often impacted by the environment. Changes in the pH and UVB impact the larval amphibians that live there. But how? Stay tuned for an upcoming publication! I LOVED meeting new people. I especially enjoyed meeting people who are working outside of my field of study. Their perspectives on my work are often very different than those within my field and I learn a lot from them.

My advice: TALK TO EVERYONE! You never know who you will meet. If you see a poster you don’t usually have an interest in, just stop and ask a question. If nothing else you may make a friend!

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Braulio Assis

“Going to SICB for the first time was fantastic, and New Orleans is a peculiar, very musical city, which I appreciated a lot. Being exposed to research from large variety of fields in biology certainly allowed me to appreciate other research areas better, so I definitely recommend attending talks that are out of your comfort zone. You never know what new ideas you might come up with!

Another valuable tip I have is, to never underestimate the power of a 25-minute nap during lunch break. The amount of information you receive over multiple days in a conference can be a bit overwhelming, so it’s important to rest whenever possible. It also helps you enjoy the nightlife better!”

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Dustin Owen

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Caty Tylan

“I presented info on validating the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test in the green anole as a test of cell-mediated immune function. I also discussed how there are different types of PHA, and how the immune response to PHA differed in the anoles between two of these types (PHA-P and PHA-L). I most enjoyed going to talks, and meeting with researchers whose work I’ve been interested in. Also, the food was great.
My number one tip is to contact people to talk to ahead of time, because I certainly wouldn’t have been able to make myself do it during the conference. And take advantage of the lunch and  networking opportunities SICB sent out before the conference.”

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Tracy Langkilde
Many of you would have played with Mexican Jumping Beans as a child. Ever wondered why it is that they jump? I presented some undergraduate-led research revealing what motivates this fascinating behavior.

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